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BorgBlog
Take a peek over Jim Borgman's shoulder


Jim Borgman has been the Enquirer's editorial cartoonist since 1976. Borgman has won every major award in his field, including the 1991 Pulitzer Prize, the National Cartoonists Society's Reuben Award for Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year in 1993, and most recently, the Adamson Award in 2005 as International Cartoonist of the Year. His award-winning daily comic strip Zits, co-created with Jerry Scott, chronicles the life of 15-year-old Jeremy Duncan, his family and friends through the glories and challenges of the teenage years. Since debuting in July 1997, Zits has regularly finished #1 in reader comics polls across America and is syndicated in more than 1300 newspapers around the world.

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Monday, February 26, 2007

One Woman's Ceiling is Another Man's Floor


5 Comments:

at 2/26/07, 8:05 PM Blogger who said...

Can I assume all those women are after the CEO position. lololol.
How about equal pay for equal work. Before I retired, I made 2/3 of the income of a male doing
work with less responsibility than I had. Is that a glass ceiling?

w

 
at 2/27/07, 10:33 AM Anonymous Dan said...

Sorry, but the mark was missed with this one.

The ceilings and walls in today's business world are for those of us without breasts, without skin pigment, who had parents who were married to each other and supported their kids, who are married to a woman and support our own kids, who accept responsibility for our own shortcomings and don't ask for handouts, and who are under age 50.

At least I know that whereever I land in this world it was on ability alone.

 
at 2/27/07, 10:34 AM Anonymous Dan said...

Sorry, but the mark was missed with this one.

The ceilings and walls in today's business world are for those of us without breasts, without skin pigment, who had parents who were married to each other and supported their kids, who are married to a woman and support our own kids, who accept responsibility for our own shortcomings and don't ask for handouts, and who are under age 50.

At least I know that whereever I land in this world it was on ability alone.

 
at 2/27/07, 2:35 PM Blogger JohnDWoodSr said...

All those ladies bumping up against that glass ceiling should realize that those CEO's never achieved their lofty status by demonstrating either a social conscience or a sense of fair play.
In the big bad corporate world, they are pretty much out of luck, and would be much farther ahead if they could mind their own businesses.

 
at 3/5/07, 2:27 PM Blogger ShayShay said...

Re 'Dan': You have missed the whole point. You seem to realize that women and black people (white people aren't completely without pigment BTW) are being helped out in this business climate. You assume that means that they are getting paces without regard to their ability. What we are getting is a chance for our talents to be noticed in the first place. Meritocracy has not worked in this country, and will not as long as being black is synonymous with being irresponsible, and being a mother is a cue that you are not strong or trustworthy enough to function in the workplace. You may think you got there on ability alone, but you only think that because of the resume cleansing that went on before you even got your first interview. Ethnic name? Trash it. Woman's name plus PTA participation? Ugh, mothers. Trash it. Woman's name plus employment gap? Must have been maternity leave; trash it. Never mind the relevant experience elsewhere in the resume. More than likely, your lack of breasts and pigment (or signifiers of such) made sure that no one looked at you and made any assumptions. They scanned your resume. Dan? Five years experience? Put it in the call-back pile. From your very first job to the position you hold now, people have taken you for who you were; a qualified employee. You pride yourself on making it in the world of meritocracy, as opposed to this world that walls out, to summarize your comment, anyone that isn't a hard working White Man. Note your allusion to people who marry their partners and take care of their kids. Most everyone who reads that today will envision black households headed by single mothers. I run one of those households, and am tired of explaining to people that I didn’t think staying in a continual shouting match of a marriage was worth my time. I am also tired of having to work ‘my husband’ into all conversations about my child, to keep some kind of social standing. When I mention him, I’m not ‘one of those single mothers’, I’m ‘a young wife’. I should be more honest. I’m proud that I left him and started working, and proud that we both continue to be involved parents. I’m very proud of my college education and experience, as well. Recently, the Student Parents Association at the University of Cincinnati was established as a bona-fide student group. When I graduate and submit my resume, it will say that I have served as treasurer, interim secretary, and hopefully president of SPA. My full name reflects neither my gender or my race. I know that without opportunites to prove my worth as a person and as an employee, being president of a ‘moms group’ is still likely to relegate me to the resume trash heap. It is this shameful fact of American hiring practices that Borgman alludes to, and that diversity programs seek to repair.

 
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